Essays about teaching reading

Introduce multi-genre writing in the context of community service. When Michael rode his bike without training wheels for the first time, this occasion provided a worthwhile topic to write about.

Essays about teaching reading

Overview When your teachers or professors ask you to analyze a literary text, they often look for something frequently called close reading. Close reading is deep analysis of how a literary text works; it is both a reading process and something you include in a literary analysis paper, though in a refined form.

Fiction writers and poets build texts out of many central components, including subject, form, and specific word choices. Literary analysis involves examining these components, which allows us to find in small parts of the text clues to help us understand the whole.

What is the effect of picking a word like "tome" instead of "book"? The process of close reading should produce a lot of questions.

It is when you begin to answer these questions that you are ready to participate thoughtfully in class discussion or write a literary analysis paper that makes the most of your close reading work. Close reading is a process of finding as much information as you can in order form to as many questions as you can.

When it is time to write your paper and formalize your close reading, you will sort through your work to figure out what is most convincing and helpful to the argument you hope to make and, conversely, what seems like a stretch. This guide imagines you are sitting down to read a text for the first time on your way to developing an argument about a text and writing a paper.

To give one example of how to do this, we will read the poem "Design" by famous American poet Robert Frost and attend to four major components of literary texts: If you want even more information about approaching poems specifically, take a look at our guide: How to Read a Poem.

Make notes in the margins, underline important words, place question marks where you are confused by something. Of course, if you are reading in a library book, you should keep all your notes on a separate piece of paper.

If you are not making marks directly on, in, and beside the text, be sure to note line numbers or even quote portions of the text so you have enough context to remember what you found interesting.

What had that flower to do with being white, The wayside blue and innocent heal-all? What brought the kindred spider to that height, Then steered the white moth thither in the night?

What but design of darkness to appall? What is its plot? What is its most important topic? What image does it describe? When you examine the subject of a text, you want to develop some preliminary ideas about the text and make sure you understand its major concerns before you dig deeper.

Observations In "Design," the speaker describes a scene: The flower is a heal-all, the blooms of which are usually violet-blue.

Essays about teaching reading

This heal-all is unusual. The speaker then poses a series of questions, asking why this heal-all is white instead of blue and how the spider and moth found this particular flower. How did this situation arise?

Essays about teaching reading

We can use them as a guide for our own as we go forward with our close reading. The white moth and white spider each use the atypical white flower as camouflage in search of sanctuary and supper respectively. Did these flora and fauna come together for a purpose?

Does the speaker have a stance about whether there is a purpose behind the scene? If so, what is it?

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After thinking about local questions, we have to zoom out. Ultimately, what is this text about? When you look at a text, observe how the author has arranged it.

If it is a novel, is it written in the first person? How is the novel divided? If it is a short story, why did the author choose to write short-form fiction instead of a novel or novella?

Examining the form of a text can help you develop a starting set of questions in your reading, which then may guide further questions stemming from even closer attention to the specific words the author chooses.

We will focus on rhyme scheme and stanza structure rather than meter for the purposes of this guide. A typical Italian sonnet has a specific rhyme scheme for the octave: Note that we are speaking only in generalities here; there is a great deal of variation.

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Why use an Italian sonnet? Why use an unusual scheme in the sestet?Job Materials and Application Essays; Application Essays (and Personal Statements) Resume Writing Tips; CV Writing Tips; A Short Guide to Close Reading for Literary Analysis. Use the guidelines below to learn about the practice of close reading.

Close reading is deep analysis of how a literary text works; it is both a reading process. Teaching secondary students to write effectively (NCEE ).

Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance Introduction to the Teaching Secondary Students to Write Effectively A writing and reading activity for synthesizing multiple texts Example 2.

4. A writing and reading.

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Writing About Reading ensures that students will be readers and writers long after they leave you by providing you with tools to help teach—including day-by-day units of study, teaching points, a sample minilesson, and student examples—plus chapters on yearlong planning and assessment.

Want to. Making a Claim: Teaching Students Argument Writing Through Close Reading We know students in the middle grades can make an argument to throw a pizza . The largest collection of literature study guides, lesson plans & educational resources for students & teachers.

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Teaching Argument | Institute for Writing and Rhetoric